in post

March 7, 2021

Image/photo


In the morning I worked on a post for the School for Peace website. I think I've finally educated them to give me the magic four items I need for a post: title, excerpt, photo and text. I have a hard time composing excerpts and titles in Hebrew, and in Arabic I daren't.

In the afternoon I worked on a translation of a building estimate. It's surprising how many English words I learn from such translations. Often Google Translate knows more than I do; though it too stumbles on some technical terms. Today I learned the meaning of "coping":

  • a finishing or protective course or cap to an exterior masonry wall or the like.
  • a piece of woodwork having its end shaped to fit together with a molding.

The word the architect had used was also "coping". Hebrew has a special term for adopted foreign words like this, "luazit". I don't think English has such a term for foreign borrowings. D. thinks the word has a derogatory meaning, however.

In the afternoon, we went for a walk in the fields, climbing up to what the people call Hill 360, because it has a 360 degree view from the top. Someone has placed a wooden bench there, on which we sat for awhile. I took out my camera and snapped a photo of the view towards the nearby village Ta'oz.

Image/photo

Ta'oz is one of a few nearby moshavs in which the state of Israel settledĀ Cochini Jews, who are mostly dark-skinned like South Indians. In Cochin (Kochi) itself, few remain; one can visit the old synagogue in "Jew Town". Most emigrated to Israel from the 1950s. With their assimilation in modern Israel, something has been lost.

The present moshav sits on the lands of the Palestinian village of Bayt Susin, which PalestineRemembered says was "Ethnically cleansed 26,579 days ago", having been occupied on May 30, 1948. The actual village was a bit off to the left of the photo, however. A few stone walls and enclosures that the inhabitants used for their livestock, remain, but the army bulldozers were particularly efficient in erasing almost all traces of the village's existence.